Trinity

God is three persons, one being.

This is the one God in three persons,
not three gods as a group.
This is the three persons in one God,
not one God showing himself in three ways.

These persons are the Father, the Son, and the Breath of Love.
All three together are God, if they were not together they would not be God.

The Father is first, always first. There is no one or thing before him.

Out of himself comes his Son but this Son was always the Son of the Father. There was never a time when this Son was not, just as there was never a time when the Father was not.

The Breath of Love was breathed out by the Father through the Son from before all things.

There was never a time when the Son was not the Son of the Father, the Father was always Father, and there was never a time when the Breath of Love was not being breathed by the Father through the Son. More than this, this Breath of Love always joins the Father and the Son together. As such, you can never have one without the other two because all three are God.

When we speak of the Father, we speak of him as the Father of the Son and as the one who breathes the Breath of Love.
When we speak of the Son, we speak of the one who is the Son of the Father and as the one who is breathed through with the Breath of Love by The Father.
When we speak of the Breath of Love, we speak of the one who has always been breathed by the Father through the Son and who joins the Father and the Son together in Love.

These are three persons but they are not persons in the way in which human people think of persons as being. They do not have their own bodies, they do not have their own wills. They are one being, not three, and they have one shared will. This means that they act together as one.

Instead of making a world each, they made one world together.
Because they are one, working together, we don’t say ‘they’ but ‘he’.

We believe in one God, not three but this one God is three persons with one shared will joined together by one shared love. He is the one who made all things and who keeps all things in order.

We believe in one God in three Persons; Father, Son and the Breath of Love.

– Samuel S. Thorp

Often theologians get accused of using long fancy words that no one understands and being too complicated. This is particularly relevant when it comes to explaining the Doctrine of the Trinity where in addition to the peculiar maths of 1 = 3 and 3 =1 there’s unfamiliar words all over the place such as ‘hypostasis‘ and ‘ousia‘, and arguments about the ‘filioque‘ (which in turn argues about the meaning of ‘atia‘).

Why, oh why, can’t theologians just talk about Trinity in simple language? Why can’t they just use words that everyone understands?

Well, it turns out – ‘there’s an app for that’.

Not for simple, clear theology but for writing using only normal words. It’s called ‘The Up-Goer Five Text Editor‘ and the premise is simple. Take the ten hundred most common words and only allow those words to be used to write whatever you want to write. And so I’ve had a play around with it to try and write a short explanation of the Doctrine of the Trinity using only the most common words allowed.

The result is what you read at the top of this post.

Let me know what you think in the comments below.


p.s. The reason for using the name ‘Breath of Love’ is simply because the words ‘Holy’ and ‘Spirit’ are not in the ten hundred most common words and so ‘Breath of Love’ is the closest I could get to expressing who the Holy Spirit is.

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7 thoughts on “Trinity

  1. Really really like that piece at the top, with the ‘limited words’. I thought that ‘Breath of Love’ was rather inspired, rather than being forced by restriction!

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  2. A noble attempt indeed! Thank-you. The Trinity is something I find to be a stumbling-block to actually believing in God as it’s such a logical contradiction. The Jews had it so much easier… Topic for the pub?

    P.s. theologians worldwide are jealous of how cool you look in your picture.

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    1. You say that it’s a stumbling block to faith, one is almost tempted to respond by saying ‘that’s almost the point’, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to worldly philosophy! (along with the incarnation and crucifixion – the context of the reference)

      I’m glad you found it interesting, definitely a topic for the pub!

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